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BERG

ALEXANDRA BERGLÖF

 

Photo by Michaella Chapman

BERG, Alexandra Berglöf, is a Swedish & American singer and songwriter in London. Together with Faris Badwan, (lead singer of The Horrors), she has created a collection of songs titled “Fake Love.” Berg’s intimate lyrics about the dark sides of life are set against Badwan’s dream-like and ethereal production, to explore Berg’s duality in this bipolar world. ‘Fake Love’ is about our modern experience: we binge on what is fake in order to escape the reality of our existence.

Whilst recording at Church Studios and Lynchmob, Berg performed at venues such as Ronnie Scotts, The Troubadour, as well as in front of 3000 at the Cambridge Festival. She is a finalist in a competition to perform at The Isle of Wight Festival. For her first release she has independently produced two music videos, set in parallel worlds: central to her music.

Berg was born in Stockholm to a Swedish father and an American mother. She grew up on a houseboat in Djurgården and at age of 5, began intensive piano lessons under the strict supervision of a Romanian concert pianist. By 13, she was performing in concert halls around Stockholm. She also started singing and writing her own pop music and was scouted by producers, whilst studying to join a piano conservatory. But after the suicide of her uncle (who lived with her), the family left Sweden and Berg temporarily left music behind.    

Berg began writing and performing again as a teenager in London, but her lyrics remained at the surface. By sticking to the fake and the superficial, Berg could - in typical Swedish fashion, bottle up old wounds. The fantasy in her music became a reality, her coping mechanism.

Only after a panic attack, during her sister’s Fringe play based on their uncle’s suicide, did Berg realise that she could no longer keep hiding from her past. She had to face the contradictions she had created in her life. Her new songs address our escapism, expose what we suppress & help listeners see beyond the disguises we wear to cope with the world.